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Are Academic Essay Writers Professional Writers?


OxbridgeResearchers 6 | 740 ☆☆  
Sep 25, 2009 | #1
EW raised an interesting question the other day: "Are we really professional writers?" I rather believe that this question is worth discussing. All the more so since many of us here take pride in our work, are truly qualified and have adopted this as our profession.

This question has nothing at all to do with ESL vs Native Writers - it is a question of professional versus non-professional academic writers.
pheelyks  
Sep 26, 2009 | #2
It all depends on your definition of professional, of course. According to a strict dictionary definition, ten we are certainly professionals--we are paid to provide a service that the average Joe on the street cannot provide. BY tis defintiion, those who can't do better than the average Joe are not professionals.
OP OxbridgeResearchers 6 | 740 ☆☆  
Sep 26, 2009 | #3
I agree. The fact that the industry is currently inundated with many who should never be allowed to write in English (including non-professionally), does not dispute the fact that some are PROFESSIONALS. Being a professional academic writer is not (contrary to popular assumption) an easy job. It requires discipline, education, excellent language skills and an in-depth knowledge of the different types of citation, etc etc. I have come across writers with excellent language skills and very good academic qualifications (both Brits and Americans). They were not, however, capable of writing a professional academic research:

1) citation styles messed up
2) poor use of sources
3) no adherence to instructions
4) incapable of distinguishing between scholarly and non-academic sources ...

So, yes ... the good ones are professionals and, they are far and few between.
OxbridgeExpert - | 113  
Sep 27, 2009 | #4
What is a 'professional'? Without defining the word precisely, any debate on whether writers who write cheat essays for students is just hot air.

Do academic writers need professional qualifications? No. Those with professional qualifications are often very poor writers and not very intellectual at all - everyone has a degree these days.

Are academic writers part of a profession? No, not as 'profession' is usually defined.

Academic essay writers are hired hands and hacks who are usually NOT empoyed at all - they are paid by the word for freelance work.

Anyone may be able to do anything PROFESSIONALLY - i.e. in a professional manner. One can clean a toilet in a professional manner, or shovel the proverbial. THAT is not the same thing as a 'profession'.

Sadly, contributors to this thread seem very poor and sloppy writers themselves if they cannot define a term before debating it. That would lose lots of marks in any essay or 'a research' as a poster states. One must be precise and clear when writing academic essays - define what one means and explore meanings. Perhaps invest in a dictionary or two...
pheelyks  
Sep 27, 2009 | #5
Without defining the word precisely

Are academic writers part of a profession? No, not as 'profession' is usually defined.

First, make up your mind. Then, look up the definition of "profession."

One can clean a toilet in a professional manner, or shovel the proverbial. THAT is not the same thing as a 'profession'.

As a former janitor, let me be the first to say fu*- you.

if they cannot define a term before debating it

This was done in the thread that sparked this new discussion. Also, given your insistence that this is not a profession based on a dictionary definition of the term, it seems odd that you didn't provide the definition from which you were working. Are you dense, or purposefully hypocritical?

Here's a definition; it's different from the one I posted in the earlier thread, but the basic gist of it is the same (from dictionary.com):

1. a vocation requiring knowledge of some department of learning or science: the profession of teaching. Compare learned profession.
2. any vocation or business.
3. the body of persons engaged in an occupation or calling: to be respected by the medical profession.

The first definition's application here is debatable (some other time for me, though..I have professional work to get done). The other two are pretty much all inclusive.
OxbridgeExpert - | 113  
Sep 28, 2009 | #6
QED
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 28, 2009 | #7
So the real debate is, what is the best definition for "profession"? IMO, a profession is a socially recognized occupation. That is, it is a job that society acknowledges to be of value. This is what separates the word from others such as "expertise" or "specialization" and defines its similarity with the words "vocation" and even "calling" (although there are of course other aspects of the word "profession" that sets it apart from the last other two words mentioned). A "profession" sort of carries a badge of honor with it. While I'm very happy about how much I earn from being a homework writer, I don't think I'd be proud to tell my friends and coworkers where I get my extra cash. That's my take on the matter.
cocklejoe 3 | 120  
Sep 28, 2009 | #8
IMO, a profession is a socially recognized occupation.

What about a professional thief? I think professional just indicates that you make a living from it (or try to)...
WriterJohn 1 | 41  
Sep 28, 2009 | #9
pro.
rustyironchains 12 | 729 ☆☆  
Sep 28, 2009 | #10
I think the term we're looking for is "hack."
pheelyks  
Sep 28, 2009 | #11
QED

Wow. A complete cop out, asserting that you've won without letting anyone else know how. Quelle surprise.

I think the term we're looking for is "hack."

Yes, but professional hack.
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 28, 2009 | #12
What about a professional thief?

That's my point. IMO, you can't call a thief a professional (despite the usage of the term in some popular Hollywood movies) and do justice to the word since it lacks that "badge of honor" bit that I was talking about.
WritersBeware  
Sep 28, 2009 | #13
IMO, you can't call a thief a professional

Then how can you justify referring to yourself (or your employer) as a professional?
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 28, 2009 | #14
LOL! Nice try, a**hole. I'm not a thief. Oh wait.. are you referring to my "stealing" jobs from American writers like yourself because I offer more affordable services? That's called competition, loser. Now go back to sucking that egg.
WritersBeware  
Sep 28, 2009 | #15
You, in particular, STEAL consumers' ability to make informed purchasing decisions by intentionally lying to them about your location, qualifications, and being bound by American law. More importantly, you also substantially contribute to your employer's ongoing thefts from both consumers and freelance writers.
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 28, 2009 | #16
You, in particular, STEAL consumers' ability to make informed purchasing decisions by intentionally lying to them about your location, qualifications, and being bound by American law.

So because I openly tell my clients that I'm from Burundi rather than some other third world country, I'm stealing their ability to make "informed purchasing decisions"? Right... ROFLMAO! And for the record, I never lied about my qualifications to any client.

You also substantially contribute to your employer's ongoing thefts from both consumers and freelance writers.

How? By writing excellent papers for my clients? You're a riot. :D

Any observer can clearly see what this is all about for characters like WritersBeware. Americans have enjoyed the ability to charge exorbitantly for essays before competent foreign writers showed up. Now that we're around, some of them would rather treat us as thieves rather than competition. What I'm happy about is that on this message board, WB seems to be the only person who has this bitter attitude.

That's all for me for now. Gotta go finish some stat projects before I hit the sack. Goodnight folks.
WritersBeware  
Sep 28, 2009 | #17
And for the record, I never lied about my qualifications to any client.

LOL! Hmmm, let's see now . . . .
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 29, 2009 | #18
Oh I'm sorry, I didn't know that "American" now counts as a qualification.

ROFLMAO!
WritersBeware  
Sep 29, 2009 | #19
Gee, how could hiring an American writer ever be important to an American student?

If being American is not an all-important qualification, why do all of the foreign fraudsters including your employer) lie about?

You lie. You lose.
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 29, 2009 | #20
Citizenship is not a "qualification," period. Excellent proficiency in the English language is that qualification that you say students are looking for. Had enough?
WritersBeware  
Sep 29, 2009 | #21
Had enough?

LMAO! Dooshbag.
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 29, 2009 | #22
Citizenship is not a "qualification," period. Excellent proficiency in the English language is that qualification that you say students are looking for. Had enough?

Once again, I never lied about my qualifications to ANYONE. I do have excellent communication skills in the English language that could rival ANY American and I do have a Master's degree. Had enough? :P
WritersBeware  
Sep 29, 2009 | #23
I do have excellent communication skills in the English language that could rival ANY American

Really? You couldn't hold a flame-thrower to me, let alone a candle. I think that a few other members of this forum would also dispute your claim.
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 29, 2009 | #24
Oh please, your reading comprehension skills suck and you have time and again shown that you are unable to comprehend the logic behind the use of the most basic words in the language. You're just a glorified spelling and grammar checker. >.< LOL! You actually come free with any contemporary word processing software. :)
WritersBeware  
Sep 29, 2009 | #25
Why don't you take one of your famous surveys to get people's opinions on which one of us is the better writer?
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 29, 2009 | #26
You mean like this survey? Oh wait.. that was YOUR thread, where you got YOUR butt kicked. :D Looks like I'm not the one with something to prove. :)
WritersBeware  
Sep 30, 2009 | #27
LMAO! I welcome anyone who actually cares what you think or type (which is NOBODY) to read the thread to determine who won that argument, like every other. Again, you're are painfully delusional. It's sad, actually.
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 30, 2009 | #28
There were hardly any arguments in it. It's just a thread where you tried calling on other members for support against me and instead got rotten tomatoes thrown at you. Did OR, Freelance Writer, or anybody else heed your call? Nope. The only person who didn't directly rejected you was exwriter, and he didn't support you either.

Face it, egg-sucker. While many people here hate essay writers, only you (and maybe the now missing in action, MAK) have ill feelings towards me. :p
WritersBeware  
Sep 30, 2009 | #29
While many people here hate essaywriters.net, only you (and maybe the now missing in action, MAK) have ill feelings towards me.

That's because you start to kiss their asses and change subjects when they confront you on substantive matters. I'm the only one who stays on your case because I know much more about you and your filthy employer than the others. Your facade doesn't fool me.
EW_writer 23 | 2,055 ☆☆☆  
Sep 30, 2009 | #30
I'm the only one who stays on your case because I know much more about you and your filthy employer than the others.

Oh please, you know nothing about me. :)

That's because you start to kiss their asses and change subjects when they confront you on substantive matters.

Ha! So when I called boom a hypocrite, was I kissing her a**? I only retracted my statement when she said she wasn't ever going to write homework for students anymore. Try again, egg-sucker.
Alex20 1 | 29  
Nov 04, 2009 | #31
Part of professional behavior is being ethical and not calling each other names. Could you somehow PM each other all those insults and not make this forum a chatroom?

You really got me - Had to overcome my reluctance and register to post a reply =)
pheelyks  
Nov 04, 2009 | #32
We only insult the unethical ones, and we don't usually have to try very hard.

Could you somehow PM each other all those insults and not make this forum a chatroom?

The forum is what it is. Some are here purely for information, some purely for misinformation, and some of us like to have a little fun, too. You're certainly welcome to post anything you'd like (that isn't against the TOS), just as you're welcome to not read anything you don't like.

Had to overcome my reluctance and register to post a reply

It was well worth it.
Alex20 1 | 29  
Nov 04, 2009 | #33
hm... it's rather not insulting anyone, rather than just the 'bad guys'. Oh well, the choice is yours...

A forum is a place for discussion, which it is by pure definition, a phenomenon started in ancient Rome. (I know WIki is not good for a reference, but then this is not a scholarly discussion). And there is and should be a difference between a chat (=conversation of two) and a forum (= that of many).

Hope it wasl.
WritersBeware  
Nov 04, 2009 | #34
Thanks for the education.
Alex20 1 | 29  
Nov 04, 2009 | #35
any time
pheelyks  
Nov 04, 2009 | #36
it's rather not insulting anyone, rather than just the 'bad guys'. Oh well, the choice is yours...

I have no idea what this means.

is a place for discussion, which it is by pure definition, a phenomenon started in ancient Rome.

The "phenomenon" of gathering to talk didn't start in Rome. The word "forum" might have originated in Rome (or more accurately, developed in Rome from earlier languages), but people gathered to talk--in ways both phenomenal and rather ordinary--long before the Romans were even a people (cf. older works such as the Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, works by figures like Plato and Aristotle, etc, that mention such activities).

I know WIki is not good for a reference, but then this is not a scholarly discussion

Wiki is often a fine source, though certainly not definitive. Some of us, however, apply the same standards to our general assertions as we do to those of a more scholarly nature--not with citations (unless prompted or especially warranted), but with some semblance of objective fact.

And there is and should be a difference between a chat (=conversation of two) and a forum (= that of many).

Your point being....? You chose a thread that had become a back-and-forth between two people, but this doesn't happen in the majority of threads, and even if it did it wouldn't change this from being a forum. Everyone has the opportunity to voice their opinion; when these two go at it, most of the rest of us eventually choose to sit out. You felt like you had something relevant to say, so you chimed in...doesn't that make this a forum?
Alex20 1 | 29  
Nov 05, 2009 | #37
pheelyks

I have no idea what this means.

What I meant is that a part of being professional is being ethical (among other things). This, in turn, implies (at least in my understanding), that phrases like 'egg-sucker', 'asshole' and such are not to be used towards a person one doesn't even know in person (or is it just general politeness?). But I figured these two have a lasting 'relationship' in this forum, so I am taking away my previous passages.

The "phenomenon" of gathering to talk didn't start in Rome.

Agree. The 'phenomenon' didn't, it's the word I was referring to (e.g. internet forum vs. forum in Rome). I was thinking of a Greek Agora when posting that message, but thought it would pass unnoticed :-P

Your point being....?

My point being, from experience on other Internet forums, is that whenever something similar happens on a regular forum, moderator comes in and kicks some ass. But again, in view of quote 1 and the fact that this forum looks like a place for writing just about anything you think, my point seems irrelevant. Adieu!
Smiley73 3 | 353 ☆☆  
Nov 01, 2017 | #38
A professional is someone who is adept at doing something. It is an acquired skill that one develops over time. Based on that definition, I would definitely say that academic essay writers are professional writers. Considering that there are varying definitions for a writer (screen writer, novelist, playwright, creative writer, etc.) an academic writer has a specialization indicated just like the others. I once did it for a living so yes, I would have, at the time, called myself a professional writer. A professional academic writer to be precise. If anyone asked, I would have, at the time acknowledged how I made my money and explained to them what it means if asked. Hey, it's an honest living in a grey area. I'm not stealing from anyone. Instead, I am giving a person a piece of my intellect. Therefore, I should take credit for it. I don't believe in downgrading my own profession because not everyone can do what, at the time, I did for a living.
FreelanceWriter    5 | 1,297 ☆☆☆☆   Freelance Writer
Nov 01, 2017 | #39
It's not a regulated field and it's populated by many people and entities whose work isn't good enough to consider "professional" writing; but for those of us who've been doing this well enough to earn loyal customers and a living comparable to the higher levels of traditional fulltime jobs as writers, I'd say we're definitely professional writers. Nobody doubted that I was a professional writer when the federal government paid me a salary for writing and there's no question that I work much harder and employ more of my skills and intellect as an academic writer than I ever had to when I worked downtown at 26 Federal Plaza in an office with a plaque that said "Writer/Editor" right on my door.
Extremely experienced, honest, versatile American writer in NYC with a Law Degree from NYLS: Visit NYCFreelanceWriter "dot" com



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